Limit Order

When you instruct your broker to buy shares for you at or below a certain price, or sell shares at or above a certain price, you've entered a limit order. Limit orders reduce the risk that an order will be filled at a price you don't like, and since most stocks move around a little on any given day, you can often get an extra 1/8 of a point in your favor just by entering a limit order and being patient. The down side, of course, is that by waiting for your price the stock you want gets away from you, or the stock you want to unload just keeps falling. The opposite of a limit order is a market order, in which the broker is instructed to execute the trade at any market price available.

 

 

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